Monday, May 01, 2006

Google Da Vinci Code Quest # 15: Curator Challenge

Hello everyone... welcome back to Day # 15 of the Google Da Vinci Code webquests.


Today's challenge is being called the "Curator Challenge"

The instructions are as follows
"Audrey Tautou is Sophie Neveu, a Police Department Cryptographer with a special connection to the murdered curator of the Louvre.

Use you curator's eye to hang the works of art such that the hooks match those on the gallery wall. Not all of the hooks on the gallery wall will necessarily be used. Some art may have already been placed and cannot be moved.

Note: The number of paintings and the location where they are placed might vary from your puzzle.

In my case, I had 7 paintings and one was already placed for me in the bottom left corner.

Step # 1: Place the larger image first on the board making sure that it occupies the least number of hooks. Also, if you place it at the wrong place or if you overlap a different painting, it just drops to the ground.

Step # 2: Take care of the next largest painting and fill up the board. If among the paintings, you have a long vertical one, make sure you have atleast three hooks. In my case, i would place it on the bottom right hand side.

Once we are done with assembling all the pictures, we are asked our daily trivia question. It is a translation question again.

In my case, it was " Translate flight to Italian". You can either use Google SMS or use Google Translator.

Good luck solving!!

30 Comments:

Anonymous said...

This is the first difficult one that I ran across. It depends on your spatial ability more than anything. The question was easy after that.

Genti said...

My Trivia was "Translate Flight in French"

Puzzle was eazy

Anonymous said...

blood->french

Anonymous said...

i got keystone -> italian

Anonymous said...

i got blade -> french
how lame

Nabil said...

I got pyramid -> French = pyramide

Anonymous said...

Okay, so I got translate keystone to Italian like an above person.... so I translated it using google and I am trying to enter what it told me to no avail. Am I missing an accent or something?

JP said...

no.. when you translate, you dont need to put in any accent or anything. Just make sure you are doing the right lang to language translation and plug in the answer, you should be okay

i got chalice -->spanish

Anonymous said...

I like the translator better than sms. What do u guys use for translation

Anonymous said...

I have the same problem as above with Keystone. I tried with both Google and babelfish, and it won't accept the translation (which when translated back means key time, not keystone), and combinations of the words for key and stone in italian don't work either

Anonymous said...

i also can't get keystone to work -- has anyone figured it out?

Anonymous said...

i guess i am lucky i didnt get keystone then. Try google sms at http://www.google.com/sms

Sam said...

I am having problems with keystone too. I am getting the answer as chiave di volta', but it won't accept it!

I tried google translator and even wordreference.
http://www.wordreference.com/enit/keystone

Anyone has any other translator which gives a different meaning??

Anonymous said...

what i suggest is that you hit the refresh button and get a new puzzle...keystone in Italian refers to the "keystone" used in architecture...there is no reference to the word keystone as it is used in DVC.

have fun,

Eli

Anonymous said...

agreed with eli...I had keystone too as my last question. Although it was a pain rearrangin the whole paintings again, my end question was chalice to french

Julie P said...

So y'all think they're looking for something that's actually referenced in the book? That stinks. I read it a year ago at my sister's house...she lives in WA, I live in FL. Guess I have to refresh the page...unless " Anonymous said...

i got keystone -> italian

11:42 AM "
shows back up and tells us what he did! LOL

Julie P said...

On my second try, I got the same word that I translated a few days ago! pretty funny. knight > Italian

Jenn said...

I got design->Italian and I found that I like SMS better than the translator for some reason. It's good if your wireless service doesn't charge for text messages.

Anonymous said...

i get chared 5c a message. I am much faster on a keyboard that on my phone though. Like the convenience of the WWW

Anonymous said...

did anyone get the keystone question yet?

johnnyyyyyyy said...

heh ... again easiest one ... solved within 5 min. ..
rebirth = renaissance

Anonymous said...

I got translate "man" into Italian.

Meat said...

Google's SMS for "translate keystone to french" gave me: "clef de voute". You might give that a shot, I had to translate "quest" to French. Found it w/ Babelfish.

Meat said...

Heh, oh, right. Italian, not French. I'm a dumbass. Disregard the last post, I'll keep digging around for some unique Italian translations.

Anonymous said...

I got keystone to french also... "clef de voute" works!

Anonymous said...

This challenge is the easiest. Just hang the largest paintings first.

~an* said...

The pattern was that there was a single 1-hook, 1 square filling puzzle in the puzzle arrangment, with 7 puzzle pieces each. Note that some puzzle pieces have different number of hooks on them.

The question = translate knight to italian = cavliere via google sms on the web.

Allie said...

Todays Answers
1) I.M. Pei
2) Philip II
3) Pope Leo
Good Luck

meat said...

Just an update for those that are stuck on the keystone part still for this puzzle. I just checked out The Da Vinci Code from the library (I haven't read it before) and on page 13 it says the keystone is the clef de voute, so it looks like that is the proper answer, even though that is the French translation. If you can't get past the italian translation for keystone part, give "clef de voute" a shot.

Anonymous said...

I got this question after solving Google Da Vinci Code quest # 19: Symbol Challenge

During Italian Journeys of 1867, William Dean Howells walks up and down which city?

I found the answer here:
http://explorion.net/w.d.howells-italian-journeys/index.html